2011-2012 Special Education Paraprofessional After-School Training Series Adaptations

2011-2012 Special Education Paraprofessional After-School Training Series Adaptations

2011-2012 Special Education Paraprofessional After-School Training Series Adaptations to Increase Student Success Lisa Brunschwyler & Kimberly Jenkins PaTTAN December 6, 2011

Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance PaTTANs Mission The mission of the Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network (PaTTAN) is to support the efforts and initiatives of the Bureau of Special Education, and to build the capacity of local educational

agencies to serve students who receive special education services. PDEs Commitment to Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) Our goal for each child is to ensure Individualized Education Program (IEP) teams begin with

the general education setting with the use of Supplementary Aids and Services before considering a more restrictive environment. District, IU, Preschool Agency Policy Your local district or agencys

policies regarding paraprofessional job descriptions, duties, and responsibilities provide the final word! Learner Outcomes Participants will: Describe how adaptations benefit students Describe the difference between an

accommodation and a modification Identify 3 accommodations Identify 3 modifications Discuss the special education paraprofessionals role in helping students access the general curriculum Agenda What are Adaptations?

Define Accommodations Define Modifications Discuss the Special Education Paraprofessionals Role Supporting Student Success Increase Student Success Adaptations:

Accommodations Modifications Why can we use adaptations? IDEA Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Americans with Disabilities Act of

1990 In PA, Chapter 14 for Special Education Universal Design for Learning Center for Applied Special Technology http://cast.org/

Increase Student Success: Accommodations Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Accommodations Refers to the supports and services that the student may require to access

content and demonstrate learning. Accommodations do NOT change achievement expectations. Focus is on equal opportunity to learn. Accommodations Accommodations are changes made to the instruction or learning

environment that do not change what the student is expected to learn. Accommodations Accommodations are changes made to the instruction or learning environment that do not change what the student is expected to learn.

Accommodations Accommodations Presentation Response Setting Timing and Scheduling

Accommodations Presentation Accommodations adjust the presentation of material Examples:

Read aloud directions and test items Braille or large print Books on tape or use of audio recordings Use of visual aids Chunking material or fewer problems on a page

Accommodations Response Accommodations adjust the manner in which students respond to activities or answer questions Examples: Use computer to type answers, check spelling and/or grammar Writing in test booklet instead of filling in

circles on testing form Dictation devices; speech to text software Additional time to complete activity or test Accommodations Setting Accommodations change or adjust the place or conditions where education occurs Examples:

Use of headphones to buffer noise or to listen to calming music Separate location in classroom away from larger group Seating near the teacher Use of potable study carrel Complimen ts of

Martha Stewart Accommodations Timing/Scheduling Accommodations adjust the time allowance for the completion of work or scheduling of tasks Examples:

Providing extra time to complete work Scheduled breaks Use of visual schedules and cueing Increase Student Success: Examples of Accommodations Books on tape Test taken orally Use computer for writing

Additional time Large print Using visual aids Seating near the teacher Fewer problems/questions on a page Communication aids or devices Accommodations help the student get to the information

Accommodations Things to think about How long will the student require this accommodation? How will I fade the use of the accommodation? Will the student always need this accommodation? i.e. think about

wearing glasses. Accommodations Activity Accommodations help the student get to the information Susie is on grade level for reading

and math but has difficulty staying on task to complete her math worksheet that has 20 problems. It is difficult for Jacob to write quickly and legibly when he is taking his social studies quiz which provides small spaces for his answers.

Linda has difficulty keeping track of multiple step or complex instructions when her teacher is giving oral directions in the front of the classroom. Matt has a visual impairment that makes it difficult to

see the smaller graphics and fonts in his algebra book. Jimmies study skills class is very large and held in the schools small auditorium. The sound level easily distracts Jimmie and he has trouble completing his assignments.

During language arts class students provide oral responses to questions. Jennifer is non verbal. In the classroom http://intranet.iu17.org/Technology/b estpractices/videos.php?page=123

Accommodations: The Paraprofessionals Role: Follow accommodations listed in the students IEP Coordinate implementation of the accommodations with the classroom teacher Provide necessary support When appropriate, decrease

dependence on use of accommodation Increase Student Success: Modifications Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Modifications

Modifications are changes made to the content, instruction or learning environment that change what the student is expected to learn. Modifications Modifications are

made to the , instruction or learning environment that what the student is expected to learn. Modifications Refer to changes made to curriculum

expectations in order to meet the needs of the student. Modifications are made when the expectations are beyond the students current skill level. Instruction is based on the students skills. Modifications are changes to what the student

is expected to learn. Modifications Partial completion of requirements Use of different instructional materials to support the general education curriculum Taking the PASA (Pennsylvania

Alternative System of Assessment) rather than the PSSA Standardized State Testing in PA PSSA Pennsylvania System of School Assessment PSSA with accommodations PSSA-M Modified Pennsylvania

System of School Assessment PASA Pennsylvania Alternate System of Assessment (found on the PDE website) Modifications Student learns 3 vocabulary words while other students learn 10 vocabulary words. Alternate book of same story at different reading

level Student learns long-division with one divisor while other students work with double-digit division. Student does not have to answer the essay questions on tests. Activit y Accommodations help

the student get to the information Modifications are changes to what the student is expected to learn. Accommodation or Modification?

Additional time to take a test Peer support provided for note taking A word bank of choices is provided to answer test questions The teachers directions are recorded for the student Accommodation or Modification?

Test questions are read to the student Student is able to sit at a study carrel to complete their assignment Student able to create an outline in place of an essay Additional text book provided to be kept at home Accommodation or

Modification? Student is provided an alternate book that is consistent with theme/topic Important words on worksheet are highlighted Modifications The Paraprofessionals

Role: Implement modifications as determined by the IEP team Coordinate implementation of modifications with classroom teacher Modifications Summary: We have defined modification as

something that helps the student access the information by changing the expectations or the material. We have discussed ways that modifications can be made by the IEP team and implemented by the paraprofessional. Accommodations

Summary: We have defined accommodation as something that helps the student access the information but does not change the content. We have provided types of accommodations and examples Learner Outcomes: REVIEW

Participants will: Describe how adaptations benefit students Describe the difference between an accommodation and a modification Identify 3 accommodations Identify 3 modifications Discuss the special education paraprofessionals role in helping students access the general curriculum

References Accommodations Guidelines PSSA, PSSA-M, Keystone (paper/pencil). (2011). Pennsylvania Department of Education Accommodations and Modifications What Parents Need to Know. (2003) Bureau of Instructional Support and Community Services, Florida Department of Education. Supplementary Aids and Services. (2011). Pennsylvania

Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education. www.pattan.net http://cast.org/ Contact Information www.pattan.net Lisa Brunschwyler [email protected] net

1-800-441-3215 Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Tom Corbett, Governor Kimberly Jenkins [email protected] 1-800-441-3215 Pennsylvania Department of Education

Amy C. Morton, Acting Secretary John J. Tommasini, Director Bureau of Special Education Patricia Hozella, Assistant Director Bureau of Special Education

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