English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with

English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with

English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with this extract, explore how Shakespeare presents attitudes to love in the play. BENVOLIO Point and quote Point and quote Point and quote Wider play Context link(s) In love? ROMEO Out BENVOLIO Of love? ROMEO Out of her favour, where I am in love. BENVOLIO Alas, that love, so gentle in hi view, Should be so tyrannous and rough in proof! ROMEO Alas, that love, whose view is muffled still, Should, without eyes, see pathways to his will! Where shall we dine? O me! What fray was here? Yet tell me not, for I have heard it all. Heres much to do with hate, but more with love. Why, then, O brawling love! O loving hate!

O any thing, of nothing first create! O heavy lightness! serious vanity! Mis-shapen chaos of well-seeming forms! Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health! English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with these extracts, explore how far you think Shakespeare presents Lord Capulet as a good father. Point and quote Point and quote Point and quote Point and quote Context link(s) CAPULET She is the hopeful lady of my earth (Act 1 speaking to Paris about marriage) CAPULET hang thee, young baggage! Disobedient wretch! I tell thee what: get thee to church oThursday, Or never after look me in the face: Speak not, reply not, do not answer me; My fingers itch (Act 3 when Juliet refuses to marry Paris)

CAPULET Death lies on her like an untimely frost Upon the sweetest flower of all the field. (Act 4 after Juliet's death) English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with this extract, explore the extent to which Shakespeare presents the Friar as a responsible character. Point and quote Point and quote Point and quote Wider play Context link(s) FRIAR LAWRENCE O, she knew well Thy love did read by rote and could not spell. But come, young waverer, come, go with me, In one respect I'll thy assistant be; For this alliance may so happy prove, To turn your households' rancour to pure love. ROMEO O, let us hence; I stand on sudden haste. FRIAR LAWRENCE Wisely and slow; they stumble that run fast.

English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with this extract, explore how Shakespeare presents The Prince as a rule (consider, as well, how effective he is). Point and quote Point and quote Point and quote Wider play Contex t link(s) PRINCE Throw your mistemper'd weapons to the ground, And hear the sentence of your moved prince. Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word, By thee, old Capulet, and Montague, Have thrice disturb'd the quiet of our streets, And made Verona's ancient citizens Cast by their grave beseeming ornaments, To wield old partisans, in hands as old, Cankered with peace, to part your cankered hate. If ever you disturb our streets again, Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace. For this time, all the rest depart away. You, Capulet, shall go along with me, And, Montague, come you this afternoon To know our farther pleasure in this case, To old Free-town, our common judgment-place.

Once more, on pain of death, all men depart. English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with this extract, explain how Shakespeare presents Romeo as a brave character. Point and quote Point and quote Wider play 1 Wider play 2 Context link(s) ROMEO Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death, Gorged with the dearest morsel of the earth, Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open, And in despite Ill cram thee with more food! (Begins to open the tomb with his tools) English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with this extract, explore how Shakespeare presents Juliet as an isolated character. At this point in the play, Juliet has refused to marry Point and quote Point and

quote Point and quote Wider play Contex t link(s) Paris, much to her parents disgust. The Nurse advises her to marry Paris. JULIET Well, thou hast comforted me marvellous much. Go in, and tell my lady I am gone, Having displeased my father, to Lawrences cell To make confession and to be absolved. NURSE Marry, I will, and this is wisely done. JULIET Ancient damnation! O most wicked fiend! Is it more sin to wish me thus forsworn, Or to dispraise my lord with that same tongue Which she hath praised him with above compare So many thousand times? Go, counselor. Thou and my bosom henceforth shall be twain. Ill to the friar to know his remedy. If all else fail, myself have power to die. English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with this extract, explore how Shakespeare presents Juliet NURSE as a rebellious character. Will you speak well of him that killed your cousin? Point and quote

Point and quote Wider play 1 Wider play 2 Context link(s) JULIET Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband? Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name, When I, thy three hours' wife, have mangled it? But wherefore, villain, didst thou kill my cousin? That villain cousin would have killed my husband. Back, foolish tears, back to your native spring. Your tributary drops belong to woe, Which you, mistaking, offer up to joy. My husband lives, that Tybalt would have slain, And Tybalts dead, that would have slain my husband. All this is comfort. Wherefore weep I then? Some word there was, worser than Tybalts death, That murdered me. I would forget it fain, But oh, it presses to my memory, Like damnd guilty deeds to sinners' minds. Tybalt is dead, and Romeo banishd. That banishd, that one word banishd Hath slain ten thousand Tybalts. Tybalts death Was woe enough, if it had ended there. English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with this soliloquy, explore how Shakespeare presents the At this point in the play, Romeo has just seen Juliets

character of Romeo. body in the Capulet tomb, Verona. Point and quote Point and quote Wider play 1 Wider play 2 Context link(s) ROMEO O my love! my wife! Death, that hath suck'd the honey of thy breath, Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty: Thou art not conquer'd; beauty's ensign yet Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks, And death's pale flag is not advanced there. Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet? O, what more favour can I do to thee, Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain To sunder his that was thine enemy? Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet, Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe That unsubstantial death is amorous, And that the lean abhorred monster keeps Thee here in dark to be his paramour? For fear of that, I still will stay with thee; And never from this palace of dim night

Depart again: here, here will I remain With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here Will I set up my everlasting rest, English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with this extract, explore how Shakespeare presents the PROLOGUE theme of fate. Point and quote Point and quote Wider play 1 Wider play 2 Context link(s) Two households, both alike in dignity, In fair Verona, where we lay our scene, From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean. From forth the fatal loins of these two foes A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life; Whose misadventured piteous overthrows Do with their death bury their parents' strife. The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love, And the continuance of their parents' rage, Which, but their children's end, nought could remove, Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage; The which if you with patient ears attend,

What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend. English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with this extract, explore how Shakespeare presents the This extract from the start of the play (Act 1 Scene 1) theme of conflict (both physical and verbal). is from the start of the first brawl seen on stage. Point and quote Point and quote Wider play 1 Wider play 2 Context link(s) BENVOLIO Part, fools! Put up your swords; you know not what you do. Beats down their swords Enter TYBALT TYBALT What, art thou drawn among these heartless hinds? Turn thee, Benvolio, look upon thy death. English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with this extract from the Capulet Ball, explore how TYBALT Shakespeare presents male dominance in the play. It fits when such a villain is a guest. Point and quote

Point and quote Wider play 1 Wider play 2 Context link(s) Ill not endure him. CAPULET He shall be endured. What, goodman boy! I say, he shall. Go to. Am I the master here, or you? Go to. Youll not endure him! God shall mend my soul, Youll make a mutiny among my guests. You will set cock-a-hoop. Youll be the man! TYBALT Why, uncle, tis a shame. CAPULET Go to, go to. You are a saucy boy. Is t so, indeed? This trick may chance to scathe you, I know what. You must contrary me. Marry, tis time. Well said, my hearts!You are a princox, go. Be quiet, orMore light, more light!For shame! Ill make you quiet.What, cheerly, my hearts! TYBALT Patience perforce with willful choler meeting Makes my flesh tremble in their different greeting. I will withdraw, but this intrusion shall Now seeming sweet, convert to bitterest gall. English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare

Starting with this extract from the Capulet Ball, explore how Shakespeare presents the character of Tybalt. TYBALT Point and quote Point and quote Wider play 1 This, by his voice, should be a Montague. (to his PAGE) Fetch me my rapier, boy. What, dares the slave Come hither, covered with an antic face, To fleer and scorn at our solemnity? Now, by the stock and honor of my kin, To strike him dead I hold it not a sin. CAPULET Why, how now, kinsman? Wherefore storm you so? TYBALT Uncle, this is a Montague, our foe, A villain that is hither come in spite To scorn at our solemnity this night. CAPULET Young Romeo is it? Wider play 2 Context link(s) TYBALT 'Tis he, that villain Romeo.

English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Juliet is just a victim to Romeos serial infatuations. Starting with this shared sonnet, explore how far you agree with this statement. ROMEO Point and quote Point and quote Wider play 1 Wider play 2 Context link(s) [To JULIET] If I profane with my unworthiest hand This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this: My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss. JULIET Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much, Which mannerly devotion shows in this; For saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do touch, And palm to palm is holy palmers' kiss. ROMEO Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too? JULIET Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer. ROMEO O, then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do; They pray, grant thou, lest faith turn to despair. JULIET Saints do not move, though grant for prayers' sake. ROMEO

Then move not, while my prayer's effect I take. English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with this extract from the Capulet Ball, explore how Shakespeare presents the relationship between Romeo and Juliet. Point and quote JULIET Go ask his name: if he be married. My grave is like to be my wedding bed. Point and quote NURSE His name is Romeo, and a Montague; The only son of your great enemy. Wider play 1 Wider play 2 Context link(s) JULIET My only love sprung from my only hate! Too early seen unknown, and known too late! Prodigious birth of love it is to me, That I must love a loathed enemy. English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with this extract from the Capulet Ball, explore how Shakespeare presents Romeos love for Juliet.

Point and quote Point and quote Wider play 1 Wider play 2 Context link(s) ROMEO: But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun. Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she: Be not her maid, since she is envious; Her vestal livery is but sick and green And none but fools do wear it; cast it off. It is my lady, O, it is my love! O, that she knew she were! English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with this extract from the Capulet Ball, explore how FRIAR LAWRENCE Shakespeare presents the Friar as a friend to Romeo. Point and quote Point and

quote Wider play 1 Wider play 2 Context link(s) Holy Saint Francis, what a change is here! Is Rosaline, whom thou didst love so dear, So soon forsaken? young men's love then lies Not truly in their hearts, but in their eyes. Jesu Maria, what a deal of brine Hath wash'd thy sallow cheeks for Rosaline! How much salt water thrown away in waste, To season love, that of it doth not taste! The sun not yet thy sighs from heaven clears, Thy old groans ring yet in my ancient ears; Lo, here upon thy cheek the stain doth sit Of an old tear that is not wash'd off yet: If e'er thou wast thyself and these woes thine, Thou and these woes were all for Rosaline: And art thou changed? English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with this extract from the Capulet Ball, explore how At this point in the play, the Friar has just married Shakespeare presents attitudes to love. Romeo and Juliet. Point and quote Point and

quote Wider play 1 Wider play 2 Context link(s) FRIAR LAWRENCE So smile the heavens upon this holy act, That after hours with sorrow chide us not! ROMEO Amen, amen! but come what sorrow can, It cannot countervail the exchange of joy That one short minute gives me in her sight: Do thou but close our hands with holy words, Then love-devouring death do what he dare; It is enough I may but call her mine. FRIAR LAWRENCE These violent delights have violent ends And in their triumph die, like fire and powder, Which as they kiss consume: the sweetest honey Is loathsome in his own deliciousness And in the taste confounds the appetite: Therefore love moderately; long love doth so; Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow. English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with this extract from Act One Scene Three, explore how LADY CAPULET Shakespeare presents attitudes to marriage in the play. Point and quote Point and

quote Point and quote Wider play Context link(s) Well, think of marriage now; younger than you Here in Verona, ladies of esteem Are made already mothers: by my count, I was your mother much upon these years That you are now a maid. Thus then in brief: The valiant Paris seeks you for his love. NURSE A man, young lady! lady, such a man As all the world- why, hes a man of wax. LADY CAPULET Veronas summer hath not such a flower. NURSE Nay, hes a flower, in faith, a very flower. LADY CAPULET What say you? Can you love the gentleman? This night you shall behold him at our feast. Read oer the volume of young Paris face And find delight writ there with beautys pen. Examine every married lineament And see how one another lends content, And what obscured in this fair volume lies Find written in the margin of his eyes This precious book of love, this unbound lover, To beautify him only lacks a cover. English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with this extract from Act One Scene Three, explore how

Shakespeare presents the character of Juliet throughout the play. Point and quote Point and quote LADY CAPULET Speak briefly. Can you like of Paris, love? JULIET Point and quote Ill look to like if looking liking move. But no more deep will I endart mine eye Than your consent gives strength to make it fly. Wider play Context link(s) English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with this extract from Act One Scene Two, explain how far you think Shakespeare presents Lord Capulet as a good father. Point and quote Point and quote PARIS

But now, my lord, what say you to my suit? CAPULET But saying oer what I have said before: My child is yet a stranger in the world, She hath not seen the change of fourteen years; Let two more summers wither in their pride, Ere we may think her ripe to be a bride. PARIS Younger than she are happy mothers made. Point and quote Wider play Context link(s) CAPULET And too soon marred are those so early made. The earth hath swallowed all my hopes but she; Shes the hopeful lady of my earth. But woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart, My will to her consent is but a part; And she agreed, within her scope of choice Lies my consent and fair according voice. English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with this extract from Act Three, Scene One, explore how Shakespeare presents the importance of honour for men. TYBALT Point and quote Point and

quote Wider play 1 Wider play 2 Context link(s) Romeo, the love I bear thee can afford No better term than this: thou art a villain. ROMEO Tybalt, the reason that I have to love thee Doth much excuse the appertaining rage To such a greeting. Villain am I none. Therefore, farewell. I see thou knowst me not. TYBALT Boy, this shall not excuse the injuries That thou hast done me. Therefore turn and draw. ROMEO I do protest I never injured thee, But love thee better than thou canst devise, Till thou shalt know the reason of my love. And so, good Capuletwhich name I tender As dearly as my ownbe satisfied. MERCUTIO O calm dishonourable, vile submission! Alla stoccata carries it away. (draws his sword) Tybalt, you ratcatcher, will you walk? English Literature Paper 1 - Shakespeare Starting with these extracts, explore how Shakespeare develops the theme of fate throughout the play. PROLOGUE Point and quote

A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life, Whose misadventured piteous overthrows Doth with their death bury their parents' strife. The fearful passage of their death-marked love * Point and quote MERCUTIO (Act 3, Scene 1) I am hurt. A plague o' both your houses! I am sped. Is he gone and hath nothing? Wider play 1 * ROMEO (Act 3, Scene 1) Oh, I am fortunes fool! * Wider play 2 Context link(s) ROMEO (Act 5, Scene 1) I dreamt my lady came and found me dead Strange dream, that gives a dead man leave to think!

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