Learning to Program With Alice

Learning to Program With Alice

Storytelling Alice: Presenting Programming as a Means to the End of Storytelling Caitlin Kelleher Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA www.alice.org 1 Shrinking Pool of Computer Scientists

2 There is a strong need for computer scientists Three occupational groups are expected to provide 75% of the new jobs between 2004-2014 Health care practitioner and technical occupations Education, training, and library occupations Computer and mathematical science

occupations 3 Projected Science and Engineering Job Openings (new jobs and replacements) 2004-2014 Engineering Information Technology

Life Science Physical Science Natural Science Managers 4 Other Countries Predict IT Shortages Too Canada: the current 35,000 openings per

year will grow to 89,000 by 2010. Currently, schools are producing < 7000 per year. UK: 50% drop in students since 2000 will lead to hiring difficulties. 5 Computer Science supports progress across many disciplines 6

Simply, we need more computer scientists and more diverse computer scientists 7 Broad reach creates a pragmatic need for diversity 8

Lack of diversity can lead to unintentional exclusion 9 Research goal: Design programming environments that motivate a larger and more diverse group of people to learn to program.

10 Related Work 11 Related Work Simplify the language: BASIC 12

Related Work Simplify the language: BASIC Prevent syntax errors: Cornell Program Synthesizer 13 Related Work Simplify the language: BASIC

Prevent syntax errors: Cornell Program Synthesizer Make programming concrete: Karel, Logo 14 Related Work Simplify the language: BASIC

Prevent syntax errors: Cornell Program Synthesizer Make programming concrete: Karel, Logo Construct programs with graphical objects: Lego Mindstorms 15

Related Work Simplify the language: BASIC Prevent syntax errors: Cornell Program Synthesizer Make programming concrete: Karel, Logo Construct programs with graphical objects: Lego Mindstorms

Introduce new programming paradigms: Smalltalk, Pascal 16 No matter how easy something is, people still need a reason to want to do it. 17

Approach: Develop programming environments that present programming as a means to an end that the target audience is motivated to pursue. 18 Solve the harder problem: make programming motivating for an under-represented group

There are many important and underrepresented groups in Computer Science. Women are currently the largest. 19 Female CS pool is shrinking quickly. 2004 1973 20

Critical Time: Middle School In 4th grade, the numbers of girls and boys who like math and science are about equal. By the end of 8th grade, twice as many boys as girls are interested in math and science. 21 Approach

Present programming as a means to the end of storytelling. 22 Why Storytelling? Given a little bit of time, most girls can

come up with a story they want to tell. Stories are naturally sequential. Stories provide girls an opportunity to experiment with different roles, a central activity during adolescence. Non-programming friends can readily understand and appreciate an animated story. 23 Developing Storytelling Alice

24 Started with Alice 2 Alice 2 is a programming environment targeted at college-level intro CS students Separate learning of programming concepts and syntax Enable novice users to create interactive 3D graphics programs Formal results show that use of Alice increases grades and retention of CS students in subsequent Java-based CS courses.

Alice 2 provides: drag and drop program construction that prevents syntax errors 3D graphics and animation engine 25 Classic HCI Research Paradigm Over 18 months, ~15 iterations Formative Evaluation: Observe middle school

girls (and some boys) creating stories in Alice Design and Implement: Improve Storytelling Alice 26 Subjects: Formative Evaluation ~ 60 Campers at STEM camps ~ 30 Local homeschooled kids

~ 120 Girl Scouts from within 1.5 hours of Pittsburgh 27 Storytelling Alice Demo 28

Changes to Enable Storytelling 1. Add high-level animations and scene support. 2. Create a story-based tutorial. 3. Provide a gallery of 3D characters that inspire stories. 29 Changes to Enable Storytelling 1. Add high-level animations and scene support.

2. Create a story-based tutorial. 3. Provide a gallery of 3D characters that inspire stories. 30 Lesson Learned: two-person talk aloud protocol is a poor match for a creative process like storytelling 31

Storyboarding Process 1. Write the DVD box description 2. Flesh out each scene: setting, purpose, and action 3. Create 6-9 frames/textual descriptions for each scene. 32 Rhetorical Information Helps 3 sources for actions: Users descriptions of the action in a given

frame Differences between drawings of sequential frames Users descriptions of the action in a scene (occasionally) 33 People are more important than objects Kids very rarely animate things.

In Storytelling Alice, humanoids and other nonbipedal characters are a different type and have different methods than non-living things. 34 What people can do Generic Alice:

Move Turn

Roll Resize Play Sound Move to Move toward, Move away from Orient to Turn to Face, point at Set point of view to Set Pose Stand up Move at speed, turn at speed, roll at speed

Constrain to face, Constrain to point at Storytelling Alice:

35 Say, think Walk to, Walk offscreen Walk

Sit On Lie on Kneel Fall Down Stand Up Straighten Look at Look Turn to face, Turn away from Turn Touch Keep Touching

Most character and object interactions can be created using touch and keep touching 36 Character actions often motivate use of programming constructs like loops, methods and parameters 37

Changes to Enable Storytelling 1. Add high-level animations and scene support. 2. Create a story-based tutorial. 3. Provide a gallery of 3D characters that inspire stories. 38 Before:

After: 39 Click on the trevor tile to see what methods trevor knows how to do. 40 41 Stencils enables users to complete tutorials more quickly and with fewer errors.

Users of a Stencils tutorial: Learned as well as users of a paper version of the same tutorial Made 270% fewer errors (p < .05) Completed tutorial 26% faster (p = .057) Made 88% fewer requests for human assistance (p = .08)

42 Changes to Enable Storytelling 1. Add high-level animations and scene support. 2. Create a story-based tutorial. 3. Provide a gallery of 3D characters that inspire stories. 43 Provide custom animations that

require explanation in the story Harold T. Wireton.crazy go nuts Animations can be incredibly powerful in helping kids to come up with a story idea. 44 Provide characters with clear roles Hero or Villain

Authority Figure 45 Related Work 46 Programming Systems that enable animation

ToonTalk (Kahn, 1996) Squeak Etoys (Kay et al., 1997) HANDS (Pane, 2002) Scratch (Resnick et al., 2006) Kids Programming Language (Morrison Schwartz, Inc., 2006) 47

Present programming in a motivating context Algoarena programming sumo-wrestlers to fight with each other Robocode programming tanks to fight with each other Rockys Boots connecting logic gates to solve puzzles 48

Virtual Family 49 Rapunsel 50 There are no formal results showing that any of these systems are (more) motivating.

51 Evaluating Storytelling Alice 52 Two Questions How much do users learn? How motivated are they? 53

Two Questions How much do users learn? How motivated are they? 54 Summative Evaluation 88 Girl Scouts from within 1.5 hours of Pittsburgh Compare

Storytelling Alice with Generic Alice 55 Evaluating Generic Alice vs. Storytelling Alice Experimental Group: Control Group:

Tutorial Build something to show in Storytelling Alice Tutorial Build something to show in Generic Alice 2 hrs, 15 min Take programming quiz and attitude survey Try Storytelling Alice

Try Generic Alice Choose Generic or Storytelling Alice to take home Show a world to everyone 56 30 min Results

57 Similar Learning in Storytelling Alice and Generic Alice Mean Programming Quiz Scores 1 0.9 Mean Score 0.8 0.7

0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 Sequence Do Together

Simple Loop More Complex Loop Generic Alice 58 Method

Call Parameter Storytelling Alice World Starts Event Since it is as educational, which system do girls find

more motivating? 59 Types of Results What girls build What girls say What girls do 60 Three Activities in Alice

2: Editing Programs 1: Scene Layout 3: Running Programs 61 Users of Storytelling Alice spend 42% more time programming Average % Time Spent on Alice Activities 60.00%

p< 0.001 50.00% p < 0.001 40.00% Generic Alice Storytelling Alice 30.00%

20.00% 10.00% 0.00% Scene Layout Editing Program 62

Running Program Storytelling Alice motivates the reluctant programmers Scene Layout vs. Program Editing 100 % Time - Scene Layout 90 80

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 0 10

20 30 40 50 60 70

% Time - Editing Program Generic Alice Storytelling Alice 63 80 90 100 Generic Alice: Arbitrary motion

(28/45 = 62%) A collection of characters that moves in seemingly arbitrary ways. Sometimes whole characters move, sometimes individual body parts. 64 Generic Alice: Character Motion (7/45 = 15%) The characters put their arms at their sides and the girl on the left waves hello.

65 Generic Alice: Story-like sequences (7/45 = 15%) A penguin moves to the lever, the lever turns and the Christmas tree lights up. 66 Generic Alice: Dance routines

(3/45 = 7%) The penguins turn, jump, and look in different directions in sequence and in parallel. 67 Storytelling Alice: Relationship Stories (22/43 = 51%) A story about a boy named Dave who has been having relationships with three different girls. They find out and kick his legs in retaliation.

The story ends with the statement And thats why you dont cheat on girls. It Makes Your Legs Fall Off! 68 Storytelling Alice: Good vs. Evil (9/43 = 21%) A story in which the Big Bad Wolf attempts to befriend the three pigs in the hopes of eating them. The pigs get scared and a ninja appears to frighten the wolf away.

69 Storytelling Alice: other (12/43 = 28%) 2 stories about finding lost dogs 2 stories depicting running or swimming races 3 choreographed routines involving cheerleaders or circus characters 70

Types of Results What girls build What girls say What girls do 71 Ease and Entertainment No significant differences between Storytelling Alice and Generic Alice users: Alices ease of use

Alices entertainment value 72 Users of Storytelling Alice have stronger interest in future Alice use. Mean Future Alice Use Scores p < 0.05 3.5 3

Mean Score 2.5 2 Generic Alice S torytelling Alice 1.5 1 0.5

0 One time use Use over the next month Question 73 Interest in a future Alice class

Users of Storytelling Alice were slightly (but not significantly) more interested in computer science Mean Computer Science Interest Scores 1.5 M ean Score 1 0.5

Generic Alice Storytelling Alice 0 -0.5 Create a w orld Learn you are proud advanced of Alice features

Learn Java/C++ -1 Question 74 Interest in HS Grow up to CS CS class

Types of Results What girls build What girls say What girls do 75 Users of Storytelling and Generic Alice prefer Storytelling Alice Alice Version to Take Home 100.00%

p < 0.001 90.00% 80.00% % of Users 70.00% 60.00% 50.00% 40.00%

30.00% 20.00% 10.00% 0.00% Chose Storytelling Alice Chose Generic Alice Alice Version Selected Generic Alice

76 Storytelling Alice Users of Generic Alice are more likely to show the world they build in 30 minutes. Switching Versions 100% p < 0.001 Percentage of Users

90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Show non-main world Alice Program Generic Alice 77 Storytelling Alice Users of Storytelling Alice are more likely to sneak extra time to continue programming. Sneaking Extra Time

100% p < 0.001 Percentage of Users 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40%

30% 20% 10% 0% Show non-main world Alice Program Generic Alice 78

Storytelling Alice Summary of Results Users of Storytelling Alice Spent 42% more time programming Were more than three times as likely to sneak extra time to work on their programs (51% vs 16%) Express stronger interest in future Alice use Users of both Storytelling and Generic Alice preferred Storytelling Alice

79 Future Work 80 Research goal: Design programming environments that motivate a larger and more diverse group of people to learn to program.

81 Other Demographics Evaluating and potentially adapting Storytelling Alice for other groups Boys Minority students 82 The Real World Realistically, most schools will introduce

programming in a short unit (if at all) Organizations like the Girl/Boy Scouts or a local YMCA will tend towards a small number of sessions. Storytelling Alice needs to inspire and enable kids to learn new material on their own. 83 Challenge #1: keep users coming back for more

84 Addictive Educational Software Choose and support intrinsically motivating activities. What extrinsic rewards can reinforce users interest in educational content over long periods of time? Access to new content? Positive feedback from peers? How do we measure motivation over longer periods? Effective extrinsic reward schemes and motivational measures can aid the

development of serious games. 85 Challenge #2: motivate users to learn more programming concepts 86 87

Motivating Use of More Programming Concepts More expressive character animations (especially facial and social), to motivate methods and parameterized methods Controlling behavior of groups of movie extras to introduce conditionals, iteration, and abstraction. Could contribute to systems that enable non-technical users to quickly prototype film pre-visualizations and video games

88 Challenge #3: enable users to teach themselves 89 Using Example Code Understanding code: what does this do? Re-using code: Copy and modify example code for use in your own program Interaction techniques for understanding

and re-using example code may lead to improved general-purpose programming environments 90 Questions? Caitlin Kelleher [email protected] www.alice.org 91

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • The Self-Strengthening Movement in China: Or Learn the

    The Self-Strengthening Movement in China: Or Learn the

    The effort was known as the Tongzhi Restoration, named for the Tongzhi Emperor (1862-74), and was engineered by the young emperor's mother, the Empress Dowager Ci Xi (1835-1908) The restoration, however, which applied "practical knowledge" while reaffirming the old mentality,...
  • Explorers, Pioneers, and Discoveries

    Explorers, Pioneers, and Discoveries

    Skill: Cause and Effect. A cause is why something happens. An effect is . what. happens as a result of a cause. Example: Situation: I wanted to go to the movies but my mother said no.Cause: I got angry and...
  • TWIC DHS IRB Briefing - United States Coast Guard

    TWIC DHS IRB Briefing - United States Coast Guard

    In the maritime domain, preventing incidents has been a core mission of the CG for a long time. MTSA emphasized the Coast Guard's security-specific mission and gave it broad authorities for MTSA implementation in the maritime arena. While the CG...
  • On Abstraction Refinement for Program Analyses in Datalog

    On Abstraction Refinement for Program Analyses in Datalog

    On the other hand, on the AR instance, for 8 queries, pilot needs over 80% of memory that it needs when resolving all queires together. This indicates, for queries correlated to each other, batching them together in Pilot can improve...
  • UKFederation

    UKFederation

    Overview of the UK Access Management Federation Josh Howlett
  • Chauncy Awards Monday 20th Friday 24th January YEAR SEVEN ...

    Chauncy Awards Monday 20th Friday 24th January YEAR SEVEN ...

    Title: Chauncy Awards Monday 20th Friday 24th January YEAR SEVEN BRONZE AWARDS Author: STWALTONS Last modified by: Stephen Walton Created Date: 1/27/2014 8:17:41 AM
  • Autonomous Cyber-Physical Systems

    Autonomous Cyber-Physical Systems

    Autonomous Cyber-Physical Systems:Stability, Modeling with Hybrid Systems. Spring 2018. CS 599. Instructor: Jyo Deshmukh. Acknowledgment: Some of the material in these slides is based on the lecture slides for CIS 540: Principles of Embedded Computation taught by Rajeev Alur at...
  • Behavioral Health Redesign: Implications for Implementing Intensive Home-Based

    Behavioral Health Redesign: Implications for Implementing Intensive Home-Based

    Summary of 14 year results derived from figures in Table 2 on page 452 from the following study: Schaeffer, C.M., & Borduin, C.M. (2005). Long-term follow-up to a randomized clinical trial of multisystemic therapy with serious and violent juvenile offenders....