Desired outcome from the Missouri Collaborative Work ...

Desired outcome from the Missouri Collaborative Work ...

Professional Development to Practice Metacognition This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Professional Development to Practice Acknowledgements

Special thanks to all contributors to the development and revision of this module. Metacognition was rolled-out for use by Regional Professional Development Center (RPDC) Consultants in July 2014. The collection of learning packages was developed through efforts funded by the Missouri State Personnel Development Grant (SPDG). The following individuals/groups are thanked immensely for their hard work in developing this package: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Content Development and Revision Support UMKC Institute for Human Development Ronda Jenson, Director Jodi Arnold Arden Day Stefanie Lindsay Carla Williams SPDG Management Team

2014 Initial Content Developer Jana Scott, Heart of Missouri RPDC _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 2016 Revision Team Julie Antil, SE RPDC Beccy Baldwin, NW RPDC Cathy Battles, KC RPDC Bev Colombo, StL RPDC Jennee Gregory, NW RPDC Debi Korell, NW RPDC Jana Scott, Hook Center Donella Sherry, NW RPDC Linda Shippy, C RPDC Sarah Spence, C SIS

Nancy Steele, Facilitator, NE SIS Sheila Thurman, NE RPDC Belinda VonBehren, NW RPDCKendra Watson, NW RPDC Karen Wigger, NW RPDC Patty Wilmes, NW RPDC The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Professional Development to Practice

Welcome and Introductions Professional Development to Practice Professional Development to Practice Professional Development to Practice Hatties Barometer of Influence hp= 0.40 N eg

ative gh Hi Lo w Medium (Hattie, 2012) Professional Development to Practice

Metacognition Metacognition (.53 effect size) (Hattie, 2015) Professional Development to Practice Metacognition and Missouri Teacher Standards Standard 1: Content knowledge aligned with appropriate instruction.

Standard 2: Student learning, growth and development (Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Professional Development to Practice Session-at-a-Glance What is metacognition? Why is metacognition important? Experience metacognition Metacognitive strategies and strategy programs Examples of metacognitive prompts

Promoting metacognitive awareness Professional Development to Practice Learning Targets Participants will learn: what metacognition is; the impact metacognition has upon learning; strategies that help students use metacognitive skills; ways to promote metacognitive awareness in the classroom.

Professional Development to Practice Essential Questions What is metacognition? How and why is metacognition used? What strategies help students use metacognitive skills? Professional Development to Practice Norms Begin and end on time. Be an engaged participant.

Be an active listeneropen to new ideas. Use notes for side bar conversations. Use electronics respectfully. Professional Development to Practice Advance Organizer Metacognition is Metacognition is not Professional Development to Practice

Terms to Know Prior to Learning Metacognition Reflection Self-regulation Metacognitive Environment Professional Development to Practice

What is Metacognition? Section 1 The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Professional Development to Practice Metacognition Thinking about your own thinking.

We need to develop an awareness of what we are doing, where we are going, and how are we going there; we need to know what to do when we do not know what to do. Such selfregulation, or meta cognitive skills are one of the ultimate goals of all learning. (Hattie, 2012, pg. 102) Professional Development to Practice Metacognition Metacognition is thinking about thinking and knowledge and

understanding of what we know and how we think, including the ability to regulate our thinking as we work on a task. (McElwee, 2009, slide 3) Professional Development to Practice Metacognition When students are metacognitive, they understand: themselves as learners. a given task. a variety of strategies and how to use

them in a variety of situations. (Nokes & Dole, 2004) Professional Development to Practice Metacognition Becoming aware of ones own actions and their effects, Posing internal questions to find information and meaning, Developing mental maps, pictures, or plans, Monitoring plans throughout a

process and revising plans when they are not working, Self-evaluating a completed plan. (Costa, 2008) Professional Development to Practice Metacognition in Summary Thinking about thinking Occurs before, during, and after doing a task Before: Plan During: Self-monitor After: Evaluate and improve

Professional Development to Practice Why is Metacognition Important? Section 2 The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Professional Development to Practice

Why Is Metacognition Important? Shapes active rather than passive learners Gives students a sense of control over learning Promotes deep learning Makes students aware of their own thinking (McElwee, 2009) Professional Development to Practice

Dylan Wiliam on Metacognition Video Clip http://www.youtube .com/watch?v=boj aoVYrBmE (Dylan Wiliam (2012), youtube) Professional Development to Practice How Are Metacognition and

Assessment Capable Learners Connected? Find a partner Discuss the connections between Metacognition and Assessment for Learning and Assessment Capable Learners Share with group Connection Between Metacognition and Assessment Capable

The learning aim of any set of lessons is Learners Professional Development to Practice to get students to learn the skills of teaching themselves the content and understanding that is, to self-regulate their learning. This requires helping students to develop multiple strategies of learning, and to realize why they need to invest in deliberate practice and concentration on the learning. (Hattie & Temperley, 2007)

Professional Development to Practice Feedback and Assessment Capable Learners Feedback to the student can be focused at the self-regulation level. Such feedback can have major influences on self-efficacy, selfregulatory proficiencies, and selfbeliefs about the student as learners. (Hattie & Temperley, 2007, pg. 90) Professional Development to Practice Benefits to Students When

Using Metacognition Changes the fixed versus growth mindset. Increased motivation/effort Increased student ownership of learning More positive attitudes Improved performance (Lovett, 2013) Professional Development to Practice Experience Metacognition Section 3

The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Professional Development to Practice Soap Dish Booth Your Learning Target: I can effectively solve or address a non-routine, real world problem or dilemma. Activity: You will work with a small group to solve or address a real world, non-routine problem or dilemma. The task titled

Soap Dish Booth, requires a trial and error approach and planning. You will have 25-30 minutes to complete your task and will reflect three times; before starting, midway, and when finished. Success Criteria: The response includes: 1) An opinion of yes or no. 2) At least 3 pieces of relevant evidence to support the opinion. 3) Evidence used as support is key evidence rather than minor or secondary. Professional Development to Practice Professional Development to Practice

Pre-Task Reflection What is the best way to do this task? Before getting started, ask yourself Have I done something like this before? If so, what approach did I use then? Did it work? If not, why not? Can I tweak that approach and use it? If not, what would be the best plan (Lovett, 2013)

or approach to solve this problem Professional Development to Practice Begin working with your teammates to solve the problem. Write your response on the Response Page. Time: 25-30 minutes Professional Development to Practice Mid-Task Reflection Stop midway to reflect and examine

your progress in relation to the learning target and success criteria. Ask yourself How am I progressing? Where am I in relation to my learning target and success criteria? Do I need to change my strategy or plan? If I keep going like I am, will I be successful? (Lovett, 2013) Professional Development to Practice Share Results Please share your decision in regard

to whether or not to set-up the soap dish booth at the fair. Please cite three pieces of specific, relevant and key evidence to support your decision. Professional Development to Practice Post-Task Reflection Ask yourself Did I reach my learning target? Why or why not? What worked well in doing this task? What did not work well and why not?

If given a task similar to this in the future, what will I do differently? (Lovett, 2013) Professional Development to Practice Metacognitive Strategies and Strategy Programs Section 4 The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary

Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Professional Development to Practice Metacognitive Strategy Programs What is the best way to do this task? Characteristics of Research-Validated Strategies Prompts metacognition and action Effective what effective learners think about and do when they approach a task

Efficient strategy works well in different situations, requires reasonable time and effort Adaptable can be modified or adapted (Deshler & Schumaker, 1988, to work across settings and tasks 1993, 2006) Professional Development to Practice Characteristics of Research-Validated Strategies Two layers of problem-solving Select appropriate strategy for the

problem Apply and monitor that strategy (thinking about thinking) Strategies include How to approach a given learning task Evaluating progress (Hattie, Monitoring and adjusting 2008) Professional Development to Practice Criteria for Evaluating

Strategies Prompts metacognition (thinking about thinking) and action An approach for a task or problem which is Effective (works in research and in real life) Efficient Adaptable Includes methods for Selecting the appropriate strategy Applying, monitoring, and adjusting the use of the strategy Evaluating progress using the strategy Professional Development to Practice

Example Strategy: SelfQuestioning ASK IT Attend to clues (What are some clue words?) Say some questions (What do I wonder?) Keep predictions in mind (What do I predict?) Identify the answer (Did I find an (Schumaker & Deshler, answer?) 2006)

Professional Development to Practice University of Kansas Learning Strategies Reading Strategies Writing Strategies Processing and Recall Strategies Possible Selves and Goal Setting Strategies Community Building Strategies Math Strategies (KU Center for Research on Learning)

Professional Development to Practice Example Program: Math in the City Thinking about and using math strategies Counting on

Double plus or minus Working with the structure of five Making ten Using compensation Using known facts (Fosnot & Dolk, 2001) Professional Development to Practice Discussion: Programs or Curricula Which Incorporate Metacognition or Metacognitive Strategies

Find your __________ partner Discuss some programs or curricula which incorporate metacognition Share with whole group Professional Development to Practice Examples of Metacognition Prompts Section 5 The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary

Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Professional Development to Practice Critique Metacognition Prompts Rate the metacognition prompts as strong or weak 1. Meets the criteria for a researchvalidated metacognitive strategy 2. Prompts students to plan, self-monitor, and evaluation while learning or solving a problem 3. Provides questions or cues as a

structure Professional Development to Practice Professional Development to Practice Professional Development to Practice Plan What is the nature of the task? What is my goal? What kind of information and strategies do I need? What is the best way to approach this?

Self-Monitor Do I have a clear understanding of what I am doing? Does the task make sense to me? Am I reaching my goals? Do I need to make changes? Evaluate and Revise Have I reached my goal? What worked? What didnt work? (McElwee, 2009, slide

Professional Development to Practice Professional Development to Practice Professional Development to Practice 3-2-1 Summary What are three ideas that have captured your attention from today's class?

What are two questions that you are still thinking about related to these topics? What one thing will you remember long after this class is over? Minute Paper Please answer each question in one or two sentences:

What is the most useful, meaningful, or intriguing thing you learned from today's class discussion? What questions do you have about today's discussion that you would like answered before we move on? (McElwee, 2009, slide 22) Professional Development to Practice

Be Metacognitive Were all winners if we finish the race. What is my goal? Have I ever done something like this before? What did I do then? Starting Line: Get ready, get set,

go How am I doing? Am I reaching my goal? Do I need to make changes? Keep moving: Keep on truckin Did I reach my goal? What did I do well?

What will I change next time? Finish Line: You made it! Professional Development to Practice Professional Development to Practice KWL Charts K

W L (What I know already) (What I want to know) (What I have learned) (Ogle, 1986)

Professional Development to Practice Its Hip to be metacognitive! Hip is in Before learning ask yourself During learning ask yourself After learning ask yourself What is my goal?

How is my learning Did I reach my What is the best going so far in learning target? way to reach it? relation to the Why or Why not? Have I done a task learning target and What worked well like this before? success criteria? in doing this task? Will that same Do I need to

Why? What did approach work change my not work well? this time? strategy? Why? If not, what is the If I keep going like I If given a similar best plan for doing am, will I be task in the future, this task? successful? what will I do

differently? Professional Development to Practice Reflective Journal Professional Development to Practice Promoting Metacognitive Awareness Section 6 The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the

Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Professional Development to Practice Ways to Promote Metacognitive Awareness Tell pupils about metacognition and model the processes in your own work. Begin with an explicit lesson on how to be metacognitive when learning and studying. Use metaphors to explain and explore

how metacognition works. Catch students begin metacognitive. Ask students to share their examples (Wilson & Conyers, 2016) Professional Development to Practice Creating a Conducive Environment for Promoting Metacognition Create a safe environment for risktaking

Make deliberate mistakes Think aloud across content areas and situations Convey the message that everyone can learn from mistakes Promote a growth mindset (Wilson & Conyers, 2016) Professional Development to Practice Intellectual RiskTaking What are two ways you can make your classroom

environment more conducive to metacognitive practices by promoting intellectual risk-taking? 1) 2) Professional Development to Practice Metacognition Assessment & Reflection The contents of this presentation were developed under

a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Professional Development to Practice Metacognition Plan Three Things You Can Do To Build More Metacognition into Your Teaching Practices 1 2

3 Start Date Professional Development to Practice Final Reflection Most important thing you learned and why? One thing you learned that surprised you and why? One thing you learned that you want to know more about?

Professional Development to Practice Metacognition Closing & Next Steps The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Professional Development to Practice Practice Profile

Metacognition Practice Profile Essential Function Exemplary Implementation When developing metacognition in learners 5/5 criteria occur: 1

Developing metacognition in learners When presenting students with a task, the teacher promotes a metacognitive environment by talking about thinking and learning in general and specifically talking about ones own thinking and learning. When presenting students with a task, the teacher models

metacognitive practices before, during and after learning. When presenting students with a task, the teacher provides opportunity for students to think about the best way to approach the task or accomplish the learning target and connect to prior experiences. When presenting students with a task, the teacher provides opportunity for students to monitor progress in relation to learning target and success criteria. When presenting students with a task or skill, the teacher provides students opportunity to determine if learning target was met and reflect on what went well what did not go well and what to do differently next time. Proficient

When developing metacognition in learners 4/5 criteria occur. Close to Proficient Far from Proficient (Skill is emerging, but not yet to proficiency. Coaching is recommended.)

(Follow-up professional development and coaching are critical.) When developing metacognition in learners 3/5 criteria occur. When developing metacognition in learners 2/5 criteria

occur. Professional Development to Practice Self-Assessment Practice Profile Excel Workbook http:// sapp.missouripd.org Professional Development to Practice

Next Steps: Action = Results What steps will you take to start implementing? Professional Development to Practice Contact Information Please contact me to schedule followup coaching and/or additional professional development.

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